top of page

What Are Kinesthetic Learners?



Kinesthetic learners are people who learn best through physical activity, hands-on experiences, and doing things rather than just hearing or reading about them. They tend to prefer hands-on activities, such as experiments, field trips, and lab work, and may struggle with more traditional forms of learning, such as lectures and reading assignments. Kinesthetic learners often do well in subjects that involve practical skills, such as art, drama, and sports, but may struggle in more abstract subjects, such as math and science. It is important for kinesthetic learners to have opportunities to engage in hands-on, experiential learning in order to fully understand and retain new information as well as create new connections in their brains.


Consider using www.KidsFreezeDance.com to add movement to your daily lessons.


 

How can kinesthetic learners progress in math?


There are several strategies that kinesthetic learners can use to improve their understanding of Math. Let's take a look at some of the most popular ways found in classrooms around the world.


Use Manipulatives


Manipulatives are physical objects or materials that can be used to help students understand mathematical concepts. They can be used to model mathematical situations, to help students visualize and understand abstract concepts, and to provide a concrete way for students to explore and discover mathematical ideas. Some examples of manipulatives include base ten blocks, pattern blocks, geoboards, and number lines. By using manipulatives, students can build their understanding of math concepts through hands-on exploration, experimentation, and problem-solving, which can lead to a deeper understanding and better retention of the material.



Engage in hands-on activities


Hands-on activities can help with learning math by providing students with a concrete and interactive way to engage with mathematical concepts. This type of learning allows students to make connections between the abstract concepts and their own experiences, which can make the material more meaningful and memorable. Hands-on activities can also help students develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning skills as they work through the activity and apply what they are learning to real-world situations.

Some examples of hands-on math activities include:

  • Using manipulatives, such as base ten blocks or pattern blocks, to model mathematical concepts

  • Creating and solving math-based puzzles or games

  • Building and measuring three-dimensional structures, like geoboards or tangrams

  • Using real-life objects, like money or measurement tools, to practice math skills

  • Participating in math-based experiments and investigations

By providing students with hands-on activities, educators can create an engaging and interactive learning environment that promotes student understanding, curiosity and interest in math.


Practice with real-world examples


Applying math concepts to real-world situations, such as measuring ingredients for a recipe or calculating the cost of items at the store, can make math more meaningful and engaging for kinesthetic learners.


Incorporate Kids Freeze Dance


Purposeful movement can help with learning math by providing students with a kinesthetic and multisensory way to engage with mathematical concepts. This type of learning allows students to use their bodies to explore math concepts, memorize math facts and make connections between the abstract concepts and their own experiences.



 

What is the best way to engage your students?


Just add purposeful movement! ​ Kids Freeze Dance™ is a streaming service for teachers and parents that features content themed educational videos mixed with purposeful movement! Each video features Jay on the Drums and emphasizes different content spanning Kindergarten through Third Grade while focusing on Math and Literacy concepts.


Consider using www.KidsFreezeDance.com to add movement to your daily lessons.




bottom of page