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How Can Purposeful Movement Help Kids With Reading Fluency?



There is some evidence to suggest that incorporating purposeful movement into reading instruction can help improve reading fluency in children. For example, studies have shown that children who participate in "kinetic" (movement-based) reading programs show improved reading skills, including fluency, compared to children who receive traditional reading instruction.


One way to incorporate purposeful movement into reading instruction is through the use of "drama strategies," which involve acting out stories or passages as they are being read. This can help children to engage more actively with the material, and can also help to build their understanding of the text.


Other strategies that incorporate purposeful movement into reading instruction include:


Choral reading


this involves children reading a passage together as a group, with each child taking turns reading a line or phrase. This can help to build fluency by providing a model for children to follow and by giving them the opportunity to practice reading aloud.


Echo reading


This involves children reading a passage after the teacher or another student reads it aloud. This can help to build fluency by providing a model for children to follow and by giving them the opportunity to practice reading aloud.


Reading races


This involves children competing to see who can read a passage the most accurately and fluently. This can be a fun and engaging way to build fluency, and can also help to build confidence and motivation.


Reading with music


This involves reading a passage while listening to music. The rhythm of the music can help to improve children's fluency and expression. Additionally, Kids Freeze Dance offers a variety of videos that deal with blending words.


It's important to keep in mind that incorporating purposeful movement into reading instruction is just one aspect of helping children improve their reading fluency. Other factors that can also play a role include providing children with appropriate reading material, teaching them phonics and other reading strategies, and giving them plenty of opportunities to practice reading aloud.



What about physical movements like hopping on one foot?


Using physical movements like hopping on one foot can also be a fun and engaging way to incorporate movement into reading instruction and help children improve their reading fluency. This type of activity is known as a "kinesthetic" activity, because it involves using the body to learn.


Kinesthetic activities can be especially useful for children who are kinesthetic learners, which means that they learn best through hands-on, experiential activities. These activities can help to engage children's bodies and minds, and can make reading more interactive and fun.


There are many different kinesthetic activities that can be used to help children improve their reading fluency. Some examples include:


  • Hopping on one foot while reading a passage aloud

  • Jumping rope while reading a passage aloud

  • Doing an obstacle course while reading a passage aloud

  • Throwing a ball back and forth while taking turns reading a passage aloud

  • Kids Freeze Dance


It's important to keep in mind that kinesthetic activities should be used in addition to, rather than instead of, traditional reading instruction. They can be a useful supplement to help children engage with the material and practice their reading skills in a fun and interactive way to help keep them engaged in learning.


What is the best way to engage your students?


Just add purposeful movement! ​ Kids Freeze Dance™ is a streaming service for teachers and parents that features content themed educational videos mixed with purposeful movement! Each video features Jay on the Drums and emphasizes different content spanning Kindergarten through Third Grade while focusing on Math and Literacy concepts.


Consider using www.KidsFreezeDance.com to add movement to your daily lessons.




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